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Page 1 of 2 of 13 Records
Bury.
Reference: 26932a
Bury....
Bury.
Reference: 26932b
Bury....
Tom Fraser, D Battery, 91st Brigade Australian Lines, Rollestone, Salisbury Plain. Submitted by Catherine Cowing.
Reference: cc30
Tom Fraser, D Battery, 91st Br...
Copy for J. Bradbury, Fairburn Camp, Muir-of-Ord.
Reference: rc18
Copy for J. Bradbury, Fairburn...
Actress Nelly Hutin Britton was born on 24th April 1876 in Bucklebury, Berkshire. Famous for her Shakespearean roles, she debuted in 1901 in 'Henry V.' She also played Hero in 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1903), Ophelia in 'Hamlet' (1909), Lady Elizabeth in 'Richard III' (1909) and Lady Macbeth at Stratford (1911). In 1903 she married famous actor Matheson Lang, and thereafter they appeared together frequently on stage and later on film. In 1906 she played Arganthael in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lang as Tristram. Britton and Lang subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. Her roles included Katherine in 'The Taming of the Shrew,' Portia in 'The Merchant of Venice,' Juliet in 'Romeo and Juliet,' as well as reprising the roles of Ophelia and Lady Macbeth. She also appeared with Lang in 'Mr Wu,' which became his signature role. In 1916 they appeared together in a silent film of 'The Merchant of Venice' in which she once again played Portia. She also joined her husband in the film 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) playing the part of Judith. After a four-year illness and a temporary retirement, she returned to the Old Vic stage in 1923 for the Shakespeare Birthday Festival and the following year as Volumnia in 'Coriolanus,' and continued to act until she retired in 1936. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. In later life she sat on the governing board of the Old Vic Theatre. She died on 3rd September 1965 aged 89. These promotional shots were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre.
Reference: 29107a
Actress Nelly Hutin Britton wa...
Actress Nelly Hutin Britton was born on 24th April 1876 in Bucklebury, Berkshire. Famous for her Shakespearean roles, she debuted in 1901 in 'Henry V.' She also played Hero in 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1903), Ophelia in 'Hamlet' (1909), Lady Elizabeth in 'Richard III' (1909) and Lady Macbeth at Stratford (1911). In 1903 she married famous actor Matheson Lang, and thereafter they appeared together frequently on stage and later on film. In 1906 she played Arganthael in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lang as Tristram. Britton and Lang subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. Her roles included Katherine in 'The Taming of the Shrew,' Portia in 'The Merchant of Venice,' Juliet in 'Romeo and Juliet,' as well as reprising the roles of Ophelia and Lady Macbeth. She also appeared with Lang in 'Mr Wu,' which became his signature role. In 1916 they appeared together in a silent film of 'The Merchant of Venice' in which she once again played Portia. She also joined her husband in the film 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) playing the part of Judith. After a four-year illness and a temporary retirement, she returned to the Old Vic stage in 1923 for the Shakespeare Birthday Festival and the following year as Volumnia in 'Coriolanus,' and continued to act until she retired in 1936. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. In later life she sat on the governing board of the Old Vic Theatre. She died on 3rd September 1965 aged 89. These promotional shots were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre.
Reference: 29107b
Actress Nelly Hutin Britton wa...
Matheson Lang was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Rev. Gavin Lang of Inverness, Scotland on 15th May 1879. (One of Gavin Lang's grandchildren, Cosmo Lang, became Archbishop of Canterbury). He was educated at Inverness College and the University of St Andrews and made his stage debut in 1897, becoming known for his Shakespearean roles in such plays as 'Hamlet,' 'Macbeth,' and 'Romeo and Juliet.' He also appeared in plays by Ibsen and Shaw and performed in the theatrical companies of Sir Frank Benson, Lillie Langtry and Ellen Terry. In 1903 he married actress Nellie Hutin Britton in London. In 1906 he played Tristram in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lily Brayton as Iseult and Oscar Asche as King Mark; Lang's wife played Arganthael.  Lang and his wife subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa, and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. In 1913, Lang returned to England and created one of his most memorable roles, the title character in 'Mr. Wu.' He reprised this part in a 1919 silent film, and became so identified with the role that he titled his 1940 memoirs 'Mr. Wu Looks Back.' In 1914, he and Britton successfully produced 'The Taming of the Shrew,' 'The Merchant of Venice,' and 'Hamlet' at the Old Vic. In 1916, Lang became one of the first major theatre stars to act in a silent film, as Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice,' with his wife as Portia. He went on to appear in over 30 films and was one of Britain's leading movie stars of the 1920s. Among his memorable roles were Guy Fawkes (1923), Matthias in 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) (which also featured his wife as Judith), Henry IV in 'Henry, King of Navarre' (1924), and Henry V in 'Royal Cavalcade' (1935).  Lang also wrote the plays 'Carnival' (1919) and 'The Purple Mask' (1920), both of which were produced on Broadway and made into films. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. Matheson Lang died in Bridgetown, Barbados on 11th April 1948 at age 68. These promotional shots were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre. Matheson Lang received a rapturous welcome and at the end of the performance he was recalled time and again, and he said it had been a most memorable night for him.
Reference: 29108a
Matheson Lang was born in Mont...
Matheson Lang was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Rev. Gavin Lang of Inverness, Scotland on 15th May 1879. (One of Gavin Lang's grandchildren, Cosmo Lang, became Archbishop of Canterbury). He was educated at Inverness College and the University of St Andrews and made his stage debut in 1897, becoming known for his Shakespearean roles in such plays as 'Hamlet,' 'Macbeth,' and 'Romeo and Juliet.' He also appeared in plays by Ibsen and Shaw and performed in the theatrical companies of Sir Frank Benson, Lillie Langtry and Ellen Terry. In 1903 he married actress Nellie Hutin Britton in London. In 1906 he played Tristram in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lily Brayton as Iseult and Oscar Asche as King Mark; Lang's wife played Arganthael.  Lang and his wife subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa, and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. In 1913, Lang returned to England and created one of his most memorable roles, the title character in 'Mr. Wu.' He reprised this part in a 1919 silent film, and became so identified with the role that he titled his 1940 memoirs 'Mr. Wu Looks Back.' In 1914, he and Britton successfully produced 'The Taming of the Shrew,' 'The Merchant of Venice,' and 'Hamlet' at the Old Vic. In 1916, Lang became one of the first major theatre stars to act in a silent film, as Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice,' with his wife as Portia. He went on to appear in over 30 films and was one of Britain's leading movie stars of the 1920s. Among his memorable roles were Guy Fawkes (1923), Matthias in 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) (which also featured his wife as Judith), Henry IV in 'Henry, King of Navarre' (1924), and Henry V in 'Royal Cavalcade' (1935).  Lang also wrote the plays 'Carnival' (1919) and 'The Purple Mask' (1920), both of which were produced on Broadway and made into films. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. Matheson Lang died in Bridgetown, Barbados on 11th April 1948 at age 68. These promotional shots were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre. Matheson Lang received a rapturous welcome and at the end of the performance he was recalled time and again, and he said it had been a most memorable night for him.
Reference: 29108b
Matheson Lang was born in Mont...
Matheson Lang was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Rev. Gavin Lang of Inverness, Scotland on 15th May 1879. (One of Gavin Lang's grandchildren, Cosmo Lang, became Archbishop of Canterbury). He was educated at Inverness College and the University of St Andrews and made his stage debut in 1897, becoming known for his Shakespearean roles in such plays as 'Hamlet,' 'Macbeth,' and 'Romeo and Juliet.' He also appeared in plays by Ibsen and Shaw and performed in the theatrical companies of Sir Frank Benson, Lillie Langtry and Ellen Terry. In 1903 he married actress Nellie Hutin Britton in London. In 1906 he played Tristram in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lily Brayton as Iseult and Oscar Asche as King Mark; Lang's wife played Arganthael.  Lang and his wife subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa, and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. In 1913, Lang returned to England and created one of his most memorable roles, the title character in 'Mr. Wu.' He reprised this part in a 1919 silent film, and became so identified with the role that he titled his 1940 memoirs 'Mr. Wu Looks Back.' In 1914, he and Britton successfully produced 'The Taming of the Shrew,' 'The Merchant of Venice,' and 'Hamlet' at the Old Vic. In 1916, Lang became one of the first major theatre stars to act in a silent film, as Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice,' with his wife as Portia. He went on to appear in over 30 films and was one of Britain's leading movie stars of the 1920s. Among his memorable roles were Guy Fawkes (1923), Matthias in 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) (which also featured his wife as Judith), Henry IV in 'Henry, King of Navarre' (1924), and Henry V in 'Royal Cavalcade' (1935).  Lang also wrote the plays 'Carnival' (1919) and 'The Purple Mask' (1920), both of which were produced on Broadway and made into films. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. Matheson Lang died in Bridgetown, Barbados on 11th April 1948 at age 68. These promotional shots were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre. Matheson Lang received a rapturous welcome and at the end of the performance he was recalled time and again, and he said it had been a most memorable night for him.
Reference: 29108c
Matheson Lang was born in Mont...
Matheson Lang was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Rev. Gavin Lang of Inverness, Scotland on 15th May 1879. (One of Gavin Lang's grandchildren, Cosmo Lang, became Archbishop of Canterbury). He was educated at Inverness College and the University of St Andrews and made his stage debut in 1897, becoming known for his Shakespearean roles in such plays as 'Hamlet,' 'Macbeth,' and 'Romeo and Juliet.' He also appeared in plays by Ibsen and Shaw and performed in the theatrical companies of Sir Frank Benson, Lillie Langtry and Ellen Terry. In 1903 he married actress Nellie Hutin Britton (1876-1965) in London. In 1906 he played Tristram in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lily Brayton as Iseult and Oscar Asche as King Mark; Lang's wife played Arganthael.  Lang and his wife subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa, and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. In 1913, Lang returned to England and created one of his most memorable roles, the title character in 'Mr. Wu.' He reprised this part in a 1919 silent film, and became so identified with the role that he titled his 1940 memoirs 'Mr. Wu Looks Back.' In 1914, he and Britton successfully produced 'The Taming of the Shrew,' 'The Merchant of Venice,' and 'Hamlet' at the Old Vic. In 1916, Lang became one of the first major theatre stars to act in a silent film, as Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice,' with his wife as Portia. He went on to appear in over 30 films and was one of Britain's leading movie stars of the 1920s. Among his memorable roles were Guy Fawkes (1923), Matthias in 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) (which also featured his wife as Judith), Henry IV in 'Henry, King of Navarre' (1924), and Henry V in 'Royal Cavalcade' (1935).  Lang also wrote the plays 'Carnival' (1919) and 'The Purple Mask' (1920), both of which were produced on Broadway and made into films. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. Matheson Lang died in Bridgetown, Barbados on 11th April 1948 at age 68. These promotional shots of Lang and Britton were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre. Matheson Lang received a rapturous welcome and at the end of the performance he was recalled time and again, and he said it had been a most memorable night for him.
Reference: 29108d
Matheson Lang was born in Mont...
Matheson Lang was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Rev. Gavin Lang of Inverness, Scotland on 15th May 1879. (One of Gavin Lang's grandchildren, Cosmo Lang, became Archbishop of Canterbury). He was educated at Inverness College and the University of St Andrews and made his stage debut in 1897, becoming known for his Shakespearean roles in such plays as 'Hamlet,' 'Macbeth,' and 'Romeo and Juliet.' He also appeared in plays by Ibsen and Shaw and performed in the theatrical companies of Sir Frank Benson, Lillie Langtry and Ellen Terry. In 1903 he married actress Nellie Hutin Britton (1876-1965) in London. In 1906 he played Tristram in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lily Brayton as Iseult and Oscar Asche as King Mark; Lang's wife played Arganthael.  Lang and his wife subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa, and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. In 1913, Lang returned to England and created one of his most memorable roles, the title character in 'Mr. Wu.' He reprised this part in a 1919 silent film, and became so identified with the role that he titled his 1940 memoirs 'Mr. Wu Looks Back.' In 1914, he and Britton successfully produced 'The Taming of the Shrew,' 'The Merchant of Venice,' and 'Hamlet' at the Old Vic. In 1916, Lang became one of the first major theatre stars to act in a silent film, as Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice,' with his wife as Portia. He went on to appear in over 30 films and was one of Britain's leading movie stars of the 1920s. Among his memorable roles were Guy Fawkes (1923), Matthias in 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) (which also featured his wife as Judith), Henry IV in 'Henry, King of Navarre' (1924), and Henry V in 'Royal Cavalcade' (1935).  Lang also wrote the plays 'Carnival' (1919) and 'The Purple Mask' (1920), both of which were produced on Broadway and made into films. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. Matheson Lang died in Bridgetown, Barbados on 11th April 1948 at age 68. These promotional shots of Lang and Britton were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre. Matheson Lang received a rapturous welcome and at the end of the performance he was recalled time and again, and he said it had been a most memorable night for him.
Reference: 29108e
Matheson Lang was born in Mont...
Matheson Lang was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Rev. Gavin Lang of Inverness, Scotland on 15th May 1879. (One of Gavin Lang's grandchildren, Cosmo Lang, became Archbishop of Canterbury). He was educated at Inverness College and the University of St Andrews and made his stage debut in 1897, becoming known for his Shakespearean roles in such plays as 'Hamlet,' 'Macbeth,' and 'Romeo and Juliet.' He also appeared in plays by Ibsen and Shaw and performed in the theatrical companies of Sir Frank Benson, Lillie Langtry and Ellen Terry. In 1903 he married actress Nellie Hutin Britton (1876-1965) in London. In 1906 he played Tristram in 'Tristram and Iseult' at the Adelphi Theatre, with Lily Brayton as Iseult and Oscar Asche as King Mark; Lang's wife played Arganthael.  Lang and his wife subsequently formed their own company, which toured India, South Africa, and Australia from 1910-13 performing Shakespeare. In 1913, Lang returned to England and created one of his most memorable roles, the title character in 'Mr. Wu.' He reprised this part in a 1919 silent film, and became so identified with the role that he titled his 1940 memoirs 'Mr. Wu Looks Back.' In 1914, he and Britton successfully produced 'The Taming of the Shrew,' 'The Merchant of Venice,' and 'Hamlet' at the Old Vic. In 1916, Lang became one of the first major theatre stars to act in a silent film, as Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice,' with his wife as Portia. He went on to appear in over 30 films and was one of Britain's leading movie stars of the 1920s. Among his memorable roles were Guy Fawkes (1923), Matthias in 'The Wandering Jew' (1923) (which also featured his wife as Judith), Henry IV in 'Henry, King of Navarre' (1924), and Henry V in 'Royal Cavalcade' (1935).  Lang also wrote the plays 'Carnival' (1919) and 'The Purple Mask' (1920), both of which were produced on Broadway and made into films. In 1940 the Langs were staying with their old friend Dornford Yates and his wife at their house near Pau in France when France surrendered, and they had to escape from the advancing Germans through Spain to Portugal. Matheson Lang died in Bridgetown, Barbados on 11th April 1948 at age 68. These promotional shots of Lang and Britton were probably taken for the Inverness performance of 'The Wandering Jew' in October 1936, which played to a packed house for several days at the Empire Theatre. Matheson Lang received a rapturous welcome and at the end of the performance he was recalled time and again, and he said it had been a most memorable night for him.
Reference: 29108f
Matheson Lang was born in Mont...